Saturday, April 27, 2013

Another Paperback on the Edge of Nowhere

Yesterday's effort to render a paperback novel cover wasn't perfect, so I spent a few minutes this morning crafting the inevitable sequel. I moved or changed all of the text elements, and I think they're all better positioned now. I wonder what the ellipsis in the Tundra Weekly quote hides? Probably nothing too flattering...

8 comments:

Sean W said...

I really like the design of both of these, but there's something about the title font I'm not fond of. Not sure what.

Awesome nonetheless!

Anonymous said...

$2.25 for a paperback!! who's got that kind of money just to spend on a book. I'm waiting until the library has a copy obviously. It seems like just yesterday you could get a paperback for under $2!!!

"Jeffaster" said...

I like the first design better as well. Your new colours clash too hard. In print, though, the colours lose vivindess because inks are less vivid than computer screens, especially with "pulp" publishing techniques. You'd have to print the covers out to see how they would look on your bookshelf. I also like the way that the font clung to the actual edge of nowhere on the first design. Having lived in Saskatchewan for nearly a decade, I consider myself an expert witness to its vast expanse of nowhereness.

I am jealous of your fonts, it looks like you've picked out a really good set. Plus, I am pleased you're showing multiple versions. I've started to believe that it's easier to show on a blog many versions of a visual piece than it is to present revisons of a written piece. Likely it's on account of how the majority of the audience processes visuals more quickly than words. Secretly, I've always felt that the Fahrenheit 451 government was onto something very dynamic and evolutionary with the abolition of writing, only their totatitarianism turns out to be a huge detriment.

"Jeffaster" (a) said...

Hey, blog readers, here's something wierd:

I've just been noiticing that you can mis-spell the Captchas and still get through.

Frequently, I have typos. I am not an accurate typist. I certainly don't cathc all my mistakes. But three replies ago, I realised that I had mis-spelled one of the words just as I was hitting ENTER. I was surprised that it went through anyways. The past two replies, I have intentionally mis-spelled one letter on the Captcha words, and I still got through.

I plan to experiment to see how much mis-spelling Captcha will allow before stopping me, but that might result in a lot of messages if Captcha doesn't care about spelling at all.

"Jeffaster" (b) said...

You can mis-spell one letter on a Captcha and get past it. Any letter you like, though.

Earl J. Woods said...

I was wondering how the occasional spammer slips through the filtering system. Now I guess I know.

In retrospect the red is way too garish - I should have chosen a brick red, or maybe another colour entirely.

Having published revisions of fiction and artwork now, I don't think there's any doubt that readers examine the art more closely. How many folks can be bothered to re-read a 1,000 word story when the changes might only involve a hundred words or so?

I feel your pain, Anonymous. Why, it wasn't so long ago that my $1.05 allowance bought THREE comic books at the drug store, and chocolate bars were only a quarter...

susan_rn92 said...

I can't believe no one pointed out that you can't judge a book by it's cover. Sigh.

Stephen Fitzpatrick said...

I'm with Sean on this one; there is something unsettlingly Seussian about that font. Especially the capital R...